Nightingale

Florence Nightingale was determined and compassionate, dedicating her life to nursing to improve the lives of others. She went against the Victorian social stature for women by becoming a nurse in the nineteenth century. She managed and trained other nurses in the Crimean War making ground-breaking impacts on medicine about sanitation and hygiene saving many wounded soldiers in the battlefield. She was British and grew up in Italy and London and later laid the foundation of professional nursing with the establishment of her nursing school. Florence Nightingale was most well known as ‘The Lady with the Lamp’ because she would make the rounds at night to all the wounded soldiers during the war.

Nightingale was an advocate for women because she widened the acceptability of women in nursing work forces and helped abolish harsh laws against women. She became the first female member of the Royal Statistical Society after analysing army mortality data which showed that during the Crimean War 16,000 out of the 18,000 deaths were from soldiers dying from preventable diseases.

Head of House:  Miss Alexandre

House Captain: Kirsty Parry

Deputies: Lizzie Myatt-Franklin, Bea Salisbury, Chloe Savage

 

 

 

 

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